China Australia relations

Home » China Australia relations

Zoom bows to China’s demands

Chinese activists based in the U.S. found their account suspended after a virtual meeting on the Zoom platform to commemorate the Tiananmen Square massacre. The video chat company admitted they removed Humanitarian China’s access to comply with “local laws,” but reinstated the account following criticism.

The countries fighting back against China

It’s been one year since the current wave of pro-democracy protests started in Hong Kong, and it was marked with flash mobs, a week after a Tiananmen Square anniversary vigil successfully defied a police ban. And while Hong Kong’s last British leader calls China’s agenda for it “Orwellian,” further preparations appear to be well underway.

Hong Kong enters a new state of crisis

Hong Kong’s chief administrator Carrie Lam thinks other countries shouldn’t interfere with China’s proposed national security legislation against so-called “terrorist activities.” However, the eruption of new protests, and how police responded to it, made it impossible for others to ignore.

China enters Hollywood with a trick of TikTok

The growing international popularity of short-video app TikTok increasingly raised concerns due to ownership control based in China. But its quest for global domination now comes with new clout: Kevin Mayer, a former top executive at Disney, was recruited to run it. His job will no doubt involve having to defend the company to US lawmakers

Watch how China aims propaganda at America

Xinhua News Agency’s animated video mocking the American response to the coronavirus earned enough attention that the Lego Group issued a statement denying any involvement with the sad Chinese state propaganda effort. The clip seemed to offer just another set of toys in Beijing’s approach to propagandizing social media to criticize U.S. policy.

The China Letter: March 4, 2020

Citizen Lab, a research group based in Toronto, released a report on how Chinese social media firms managed information about COVID-19. WeChat and YY were the platforms caught censoring keywords related to the outbreak. But amidst claims of a cover-up going back to December, the country is trying to promote a lack of impact:

The China Letter: February 27, 2020

VICE compiled a review of reported incidents of China probing social media for posts about the outbreak of COVID-19, and then tracking down dissenters. Expert observers note how more of it came after president Xi Jinping’s first public comments on the coronavirus on January 20. The effects have seemingly spread to news outlets.

Go to Top