China state surveillance

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China brings the hammer down on Hong Kong

It didn’t take long for the new national security law, which was passed by China on June 30, to be enacted for arrests of more than 300 protesters in Hong Kong. Minutes after it was official, several pro-democracy activists quit. It came into effect 23 years after Hong Kong returned to China, as the Communist party kicks off its 100th year.

Hong Kong enters a new state of crisis

Hong Kong’s chief administrator Carrie Lam thinks other countries shouldn’t interfere with China’s proposed national security legislation against so-called “terrorist activities.” However, the eruption of new protests, and how police responded to it, made it impossible for others to ignore.

Shanghai Disneyland is a small world away

While cutting its maximum capacity from 80,000 to 24,000 visitors a day, along with installing anti-virus controls, the re-opening of Shanghai Disneyland told a story in pictures of how China is attempting to revive daily life after its peak of COVID-19, through symbols of American pop culture. Masked workouts have also become a new normal:

Watch how China aims propaganda at America

Xinhua News Agency’s animated video mocking the American response to the coronavirus earned enough attention that the Lego Group issued a statement denying any involvement with the sad Chinese state propaganda effort. The clip seemed to offer just another set of toys in Beijing’s approach to propagandizing social media to criticize U.S. policy.

China shows what post-pandemic life is like

whether you believe it or not. “Normal life is a distant dream” reads the New York Times headline on the story about the end of the 76-day lockdown of the coronavirus epicentre of Wuhan, amid masks everywhere. Movement requires a green symbol on a surveillance-based smartphone. And there are fears of a major relapse, even after daily COVID-19 deaths allegedly touched zero.

The China Letter: February 12, 2020

Friends and family of 34-year-old Chen Qiushi fear that he may have been forcibly quarantined by the government after he posted videos and messages that criticized hardship in Wuhan due to what’s been formally called COVID-19. The Committee to Protect Journalists called on authorities to reveal his whereabouts, to no avail.

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